Bero uses astronomy and aviation interest to create science webinar – The Madison Record

MADISON – To develop her webinar this summer, Beth Bero drew on her studies in science, technology, engineering and math or STEM material, as well as her background in astronomy and her inclination for possibilities in space.

Bero works as a Gifted Specialist at Horizon Elementary School. Bero won the 2020 Educator Achievement Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

“I gave a one-hour lecture as part of a monthly lecture series reserved for members of the Alabama Association for Gifted Children or AAGC. They asked me to present and gave me the free choice of subject, ”said Bero.

Looking at the available dates, July 20 struck Bero as a great connection to a space-themed talk for the 52nd anniversary of man’s first step on the moon.

“I watched Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walk on the moon on a black and white TV with my parents at home in Clearwater, Florida,” she said. “My father worked for Honeywell (on) the team preparing the gyro systems for the Gemini and Apollo missions.”

Bero said teachers can share their love of space and the night sky with students and their schools. She discussed ways to partner with local astronomy clubs and access help from NASA to introduce students to the night sky – perhaps even instituting a “Space Week” in school.

The AAGC conference October 13-15 will be held at the Birmingham Marriott. The AAGC asked supervisors (in Madison – Melissa Mims, Elementary Education Coordinator) to recommend gifted specialists with exciting and interesting ideas to share with their peers.

From MCS, Emily Boshers, Rachel Gibbs, Beth Woodard and Bero have been selected as presenters.

During a session, each specialist will have a maximum of 10 minutes to speak on a subject of their choice. At the end of the workshop, participants can interview the presenters of the “Best of the Best Gifted” workshop about understanding the practices gifted education teachers use to meet the varied needs of gifted children.

Bero’s half-day presentation at the conference will focus on curriculum planning for gifted programs.

Bero once taught gifted students at Dunbar Sixth Grade Center in Tampa, Florida. She holds NBCT or National Board Certified Teacher status.

For more information, visit https://alabamagifted.org/event-4370835.


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St. Louis Park Public Schools to Offer Online Education Through Eden Prairie Schools | Saint-Louis Park

Districts pursued partnership because of state rules

Online schooling will be an option for St. Louis Park students this school year, but teachers will instead be from the Eden Prairie School District.

Last year, the St. Louis Park School District offered online education with its own teachers – some who took on the challenge of teaching students in front of them and virtually at the same time.

The Association of Metropolitan School Districts has sought to convince lawmakers to allow all districts to continue offering the same distance learning programs as last year, but lawmakers failed to come to an agreement to allow to these programs to stay.

A Minnesota Department of Education document dated August 6 states that districts that wish to provide online education to students for more than half of the student’s weekly schedule must seek interim state approval in as an e-learning provider.

Some districts, like Eden Prairie Schools, have hired additional staff to become a state-approved online education provider.

“Smaller districts like St. Louis Park need to find other creative ways to continue to ensure that students and families who want to learn online have access to it,” said the St. Louis Park School District Superintendent, Astein Osei, at a school board meeting in August. . ten.

Although he said state rules would have allowed the district to offer students a mix of in-person and online learning using its own staff, the superintendent said families in St. Louis Park who were looking for an option online were concerned about the pandemic and did not want their children to have to attend school in person every week.

After exploring relationships with a variety of potential online school providers, Osei said St. Louis Park administrators felt better about Eden Prairie Schools’ EP Online system.

The two districts are seeking a deal that would ensure schools in Eden Prairie receive funding for the services they have provided, while public schools in St. Louis Park continue to offer special education and counseling services. The St. Louis Park District is considering creating a classroom experience or advisory role to connect its students online with St. Louis Park staff “so that throughout this process that student knows. that there are always staff here who look after them, support them and keep them. them connected to our school district, ”Osei said.

Recognizing the risk that online students may leave the St. Louis Park School District in the future, Osei added: Connections and supports for our students who choose this option online.

The District of St. Louis Park is seeking to “build an exit ramp” with schools in Eden Prairie so that families in St. Louis Park using EP Online can send their children to school in person if COVID-conditions occur. 19 are improving, according to Osei.

He noted that both districts have a Spanish immersion school. EP Online will offer instruction in Spanish for Kindergarten and Grade 1 this school year, but currently there are not enough students enrolled to offer instruction in Spanish for grades 2 to 6. Osei said the district will determine how to meet the needs of Park Spanish Immersion Elementary School students in classes who want an online experience once authorities determine the number of families involved.

St. Louis Park School Board President Mary Tomback noted that last year the state required districts to offer online education.

Given the state’s rules for this school year, Tomback said, “What you’re doing now through this plan, in this program with Eden Prairie, is to try to provide our families who really think it’s is the best option for their students with some option to continue to get involved in St. Louis Park schools, but to keep their children in the distance learning environment if they think that’s what. there is better.

“There are several families who are very concerned about what is going on and are not comfortable sending their children in person to school at this time,” Osei said.

Board member Anne Casey noted that Intermediate District 287, a consortium of western metro districts that includes St. Louis Park and Eden Prairie, offers an online program called Northern Star Online. However, all classes are considered asynchronous, which means that students are not learning live from a teacher at the same time as other students. As a result, Casey said the system is better for students taking one or two courses rather than taking full-time.

Osei said St. Louis park officials had several conversations with staff at Middle District 287 about the Northern Star Online system, but agreed that it was not suitable for students taking full-time online courses. .

In contrast, he said that EP Online offers both live and asynchronous experiences, with younger students receiving the most live instruction.

“EP Online for K-5 grades offers live, online interaction with teachers every day,” according to the St. Louis Park School District website, slpschools.org. “Students in Grades 6 to 12 will experience a mixed model of live instruction and independent work that provides greater flexibility for students. “

The district planned to notify families of the EP Online option by August 20.

Eden Prairie Schools is offering a webinar on the program with Principal Raymond Diaz at 2:30 p.m. on August 26. One description lists Eden Prairie Schools as “the premier school district in Minnesota” and notes that the district hires, trains, and retains teachers for PE Online.

The description reads: “EP Online offers a one-of-a-kind online experience where students can learn with a teacher live almost every school day. Say goodbye to the isolation of online learning and experience the EP Online advantage.

Copyright © 2021 at Sun Newspapers / APG Media of East Central Minnesota. Digital distribution of this content without prior written consent is a violation of federal law and may be subject to legal action.


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St. Louis Park Public Schools to Offer Online Education through Eden Prairie Schools | Saint-Louis Park

Districts pursued partnership because of state rules

Online schooling will be an option for St. Louis Park students this school year, but teachers will instead be from the Eden Prairie School District.

Last year, the St. Louis Park School District offered online education with its own teachers – some who took on the challenge of teaching students in front of them and virtually at the same time.

The Association of Metropolitan School Districts has sought to convince lawmakers to allow all districts to continue offering the same distance learning programs as last year, but lawmakers failed to come to an agreement to allow to these programs to stay.

A Minnesota Department of Education document dated August 6 states that districts that wish to provide online education to students for more than half of the student’s weekly schedule must seek interim state approval in as an e-learning provider.

Some districts, like Eden Prairie Schools, have hired additional staff to become a state-approved online education provider.

“Smaller districts like St. Louis Park need to find other creative ways to continue to ensure that students and families who want to learn online have access to it,” said the St. Louis Park School District Superintendent, Astein Osei, at a school board meeting in August. . ten.

Although he said state rules would have allowed the district to offer students a mix of in-person and online learning using its own staff, the superintendent said families in St. Louis Park who were looking for an option online were concerned about the pandemic and did not want their children to have to attend school in person every week.

After exploring relationships with a variety of potential online school providers, Osei said St. Louis Park administrators felt better about Eden Prairie Schools’ EP Online system.

The two districts are seeking a deal that would ensure schools in Eden Prairie receive funding for the services they have provided, while public schools in St. Louis Park continue to offer special education and counseling services. The St. Louis Park District is considering creating a homeroom experience or advisory role to connect its students online with St. Louis Park staff “so that throughout this process the student know that there are always staff here who look after them, support them and keep them connected to our school district, ”Osei said.

Recognizing the risk that online students may leave the St. Louis Park School District in the future, Osei added, “We really want to be intentional throughout this process, making sure that by making this deal of timeshare, we continue to maintain a positive attitude. relationships and supports for our students who choose this option online.

The District of St. Louis Park is looking to “build an exit ramp” with schools in Eden Prairie so that families in St. Louis Park using EP Online can send their children to school in person if COVID conditions -19 are improving, according to Osei.

He noted that both districts have a Spanish immersion school. EP Online will offer instruction in Spanish for Kindergarten and Grade 1 this school year, but currently there are not enough students enrolled to offer instruction in Spanish for grades 2 to 6. Osei said the district will determine how to meet the needs of Park Spanish Immersion Elementary School students in classes who want an online experience once authorities determine the number of families involved.

St. Louis Park School Board President Mary Tomback noted that last year the state required districts to offer online education.

Given the state’s rules for this school year, Tomback said, “What you’re doing now through this plan, in this program with Eden Prairie, is to try to provide our families who really think it’s is the best option for their students with some option to continue to get involved in St. Louis Park schools, but to keep their children in the distance learning environment if they think that’s what. there is better.

“There are several families who are very concerned about what is going on and are not comfortable sending their children in person to school at this time,” Osei said.

Board member Anne Casey noted that Intermediate District 287, a consortium of western metropolitan districts that includes St. Louis Park and Eden Prairie, offers an online program called Northern Star Online. However, all classes are considered asynchronous, which means that students are not learning live from a teacher at the same time as other students. As a result, Casey said the system is better for students taking one or two courses rather than taking full-time.

Osei said park officials in St. Louis had multiple conversations with staff at Middle District 287 about the Northern Star Online system, but agreed that it was not suitable for students taking online classes on time. full.

In contrast, he said that EP Online offers both live and asynchronous experiences, with younger students receiving the most live instruction.

“EP Online for K-5 grades offers live, online interaction with teachers every day,” according to the St. Louis Park School District website, slpschools.org. “Students in Grades 6 to 12 will experience a mixed model of live instruction and independent work that provides greater flexibility for students. “

The district planned to notify families of the EP Online option by August 20.

Eden Prairie Schools is offering a program webinar with Principal Raymond Diaz at 2:30 p.m. on August 26. One description lists Eden Prairie Schools as “the premier school district in Minnesota” and notes that the district hires, trains, and retains teachers for PE Online.

The description reads: “EP Online offers a one-of-a-kind online experience where students can learn with a teacher live almost every school day. Say goodbye to the isolation of online learning and experience the EP Online advantage.

Copyright © 2021 at Sun Newspapers / APG Media of East Central Minnesota. Digital distribution of this content without prior written consent is a violation of federal law and may be subject to legal action.


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SPI hosts a webinar on Safe and Successful Schools

California Department of Education
Press release

California Department of Education
Press release

Exit: # 21-59
25 August 2021

SACRAMENTO – State Superintendent of Public Education Tony Thurmond convened experts in public health and education on Wednesday for a broad discussion on COVID-19 data and mitigation efforts that have resulted in the safe reopening of thousands of schools across California.

The Safe and Successful Schools webinar was developed in partnership by the California Department of Education (CDE), the California Department of Public Health, the State Board of Education, and the Office of Governor Gavin Newsom.

Dr Naomi Bardach of the Safe Schools for All team and State Council President Linda Darling-Hammond shared information on California’s robust and multi-layered approach to COVID-19 prevention, which does not has resulted in no delay in reopening schools so far during the fall semester. Bardach and Darling-Hammond shared data that shows how state-backed COVID-19 testing programs, on-site vaccination clinics, universal masking and detailed quarantine advice have helped keep California students in the classroom and to learn despite the awkward climb of the Delta variant. A recording of the webinar is available on the CDE Facebook page
The external link opens in a new window or tab.
.

“In-person teaching is so important for our students to be close to their peers and to have access to their educators, I want to congratulate all of our school districts who have opened and those who are preparing to open in the coming days,” Thurmond said. “We know what you have done is amazing to support our students and we also know this is happening under very difficult circumstances as we see the Delta variant continue to create challenges. But even so, by following all COVID mitigation strategies, we can keep our schools open and keep our children safe. Vaccines, mask wear and regular testing continue to provide a high quality educational opportunity for our students. Today is the first of many conversations we hope to have with our education leaders, parents and partners about how we operate and how we can keep ourselves safe and support students. “

Thurmond cited the webinar as another important effort in the state’s continuing message on how immunizing every eligible person will be essential for schools and communities.

“Research confirms that we need to keep schools open to promote the mental, socio-emotional and academic well-being of students,” Bardach said. She explained that new data shows that the Delta variant is more than twice as contagious as previous variants and that those who are not vaccinated are more than 11 times likely to be positive. Bardach said the vaccines are effective against Delta and have walked through key layers for safe schools that include combined vaccines with testing, masking, ventilation and staying home when sick.

Darling-Hammond urged local education agencies (LEA) to plan and prepare for prosecution of high cases, but said California is in a better place due to vaccines and masking. “We are a long way from the winter power surge in California, there are no delays in California due to COVID,” Darling-Hammond said. She explained how LEAs can access clinics located in schools, receive grants to become vaccine providers, and how independent study can be used as a short and long term option to ensure that instruction is ongoing. during quarantine. “If we open up vaccination clinics, especially in middle and high schools, we’ll be in a very different place in a few months,” Darling-Hammond said.

Before concluding the webinar, Thurmond acknowledged the resilience he has witnessed firsthand during his recent visits to schools across the state. “COVID-19 is the most difficult challenge most of us will experience in our lifetime,” Thurmond said.

“We can’t control what the coronavirus does, but we can control what we do and how we respond to it – we’re all in the same boat and as difficult as it may be, it can be done and the rewards are great. : give students the opportunity to have in-person instruction.

The Safe and Successful Schools webinar includes an American Sign Language interpretation service and can be viewed on the CDE’s Facebook page
The external link opens in a new window or tab.
. Slides from today’s presentation
The external link opens in a new window or tab. (PPTX)
are available for download from the California Department of Public Health website. To find a vaccination clinic near you, visit the My Turn – California COVID-19 website
The external link opens in a new window or tab.
.

# # # #

Tony Thurmond – State Superintendent of Public Education
Communications Division, Suite 5602, 916-319-0818, Fax 916-319-0100

Last revised: Thursday, August 26, 2021


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Kent State Hosts Q&A Webinar for Faculty and Staff Ahead of Fall Semester | Latest Updates

Kent State hosted a virtual town hall for faculty and staff on Thursday to address questions and concerns related to the fall semester 2021.

Panelists included Peggy Shadduck, vice president of regional campuses and dean of the College of Applied and Technical Studies; Tara Smith, professor of epidemiology at the College of Public Health; Manfred van Dulmen, Chairman of the Pandemic Leadership Committee, Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Division of Graduate Studies; Julie Volcheck, assistant vice-president for student affairs and director of university health services; Jack Witt, vice president of human resources; and Melissa Zullo, Professor of Epidemiology and Acting Assistant Dean of the College of Public Health.

Panelists responded to a range of questions, from college advice on masks and vaccines to the likelihood that students and staff would be asked to resume distance education.

The the university has updated its guidelines on masks On August 3, masks must be worn indoors and on public transport, regardless of vaccination status.

“It’s something we wanted to do because our goal is to stay together, in person, throughout the semester. We want to start safe and stay safe, ”said van Dulmen. “It was not due to a safety concern,… but we had to, as a precautionary measure, go in that direction.”

Kent State also offers testing for asymptomatic and symptomatic people.

“We have testing for asymptomatic people, people without symptoms and possible close contact or exposure on campus,” Volcheck said. “From Monday to Friday, Visit Health provides service, and they are located at the Ice Arena, Eastway Lounge and MACC Third Floor Lodge.

Symptomatic tests will be available at DeWeese Health Center. For more information on the university’s COVID-19 test plan, visit this link. People who test positive for COVID-19 should call COVID Response Team, reachable at (330) 672-2525.

During the town hall, panelists responded to a question asking if faculty and staff had an opportunity to ask students and colleagues about their immunization status.

“The simple answer is no, because knowing that immunization status should not change what the student, or colleague will or will not do,” Volcheck said. “This is personal health information, and if people, through casual conversation, want to disclose it in the office, that is one thing, but no one should ask them outright. Just as we don’t ask about people’s health, we shouldn’t ask about vaccines. “

Volcheck said the university is working on a project that will allow the university to ask people to disclose this information.

van Dulmen said the university does not have a threshold or a number of COVID-19 cases that would result in a shift to fully distance learning at this time. The university, he said, regularly checks its COVID-19 numbers and indicators.

“Thank you for the hard work everyone has done throughout the pandemic,” Shadduck said. “We have had a lot of people on regional campuses, like on campus, who have found safe ways to continue working on site. … Very happy to rediscover the sense of community that comes from working together, the ways in which we can best support students and learning.

A recording of the virtual town hall is available on State of Kent today.

Emma Andrus is a journalist. Contact her at [email protected]


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Webinar discusses ways to promote racial equality in student mental health

The murder of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, the prevalence of anti-Asian hate crimes amid the pandemic, the death of United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. The list goes on. A lot has happened in the past 18 months. Many students, especially students of color, have experienced mental health issues while dealing with virtual learning. As most of the students return to campus in the fall, administrators from higher education institutions and mental health experts gathered virtually on Thursday to discuss how best to help students navigate the course. next semester.

“We can take this moment to consciously choose how to move forward in an innovative and equitable way that is particularly relevant to supporting our BIPOC students,” said Dr. Carlota Ocampo, president at Trinity Washington University and moderator of the webinar. titled “Promoting Race Equity in Student Mental Health: Considerations and Strategies for Returning to In-Person Teaching.Dr Carlota Ocampo

Even before the pandemic, schools struggled to hire students of color.

Dr. Cirleen DeBlaere, associate professor of counseling psychology at Georgia State University, noted that only about 28% of students of color think their campus is inclusive according to a 2017 survey. In her own study, DeBlaere also found that over 70% of students of color had suffered a micro-assault on campus and that would only be magnified by the pandemic.

“All these incidences of micro-aggressions can accumulate to [and] contributing to racial trauma, ”she said, adding that hearing about other people’s experiences or seeing them on social media sites could have a negative impact on student mental health.

“All of these have mental health implications in terms of depression, anxiety, lowered self-esteem, binge drinking, and symptoms of PTSD,” DeBlaere said.

The trauma experienced by students of color can affect them not only mentally but also physically. Dr. Stephen Quaye, associate professor of educational studies at Ohio State University, studied the phenomenon called racial combat fatigue, the exhaustion that people of color experience from repeated racism.

“[People] who suffer from racial fatigue in combat often also have headaches, grinding of teeth, shortness of breath, ”Quaye said. “We might also have trouble sleeping, then emotionally and behaviorally, loss of appetite, increased alcohol and drug use as a coping mechanism. And then poor academic and professional performance.

To better accommodate students who have experienced racial trauma in the past year, Ocampo suggested devoting more resources to faculty development.

“When students walk into a classroom at any institution, what they see is their faculty, and for them that faculty is the institution,” Ocampo said.

She noted that some white teachers might avoid certain subjects for fear of making mistakes. Universities and colleges, she added, must help all faculty create a safe and welcoming campus climate for students.

University of Michigan professor Dr. William Lopez noted that even small changes to the curriculum can help traumatized students feel more seen and included. Since the start of the pandemic, he has added a note to his program.

“[The note] help students understand that I understand that their life is very difficult at the moment. And so my expectations are not what they were before, ”he said. “We are not in a normal period. So we shouldn’t be doing normal things. “

Lopez said the faculty must validate the feelings of the students.

“‘I hear you.’ “I’m sorry you went through this.” ‘What do you need?’ These are the means to answer it. ”He added.


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Pamela Murphy wins the Fred Kirschner Award for teaching excellence

ROCHESTER, New York State – Continental Service Group, Inc., dba ConServe is proud to announce that Pam Murphy, Vice President of Compliance and Privacy, has been recognized and received the Fred Kirschner Instruction Achievement Award for hosting 75 seminars at the convention ACA International Annual 2021 in Las Vegas. , NV July 30, 2021.

The Fred Kirschner Instructor Achievement Award is presented to ACA certified instructors who have reached milestones in their volunteer teaching career with ACA. Named after Fred Kirschner, former ACA Certified Instructor and Past President, these awards are given to instructors who have taught 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and more ACA seminars.

Pam had already received this recognition in 2016 for completing 50 seminars, and now again in 2021 for completing 75 seminars. ConServe President Richard Klein commented, “Pam is an inspiration and a wonderful role model, mentor and visionary to our employees and the collection industry.” Pam Murphy said: “I am delighted to be part of a corporate culture that values ​​and contributes to industry and community education efforts. As a certified instructor, I am able to provide impactful training and advice to our employees and industry experts that enable them to be successful. This accountability results in the achievement of an excellent compliance and operational performance
for our valued customers and the industry as a whole.

[article_ad]

Join ConServe on Tuesday September 21, 2021 where Pam Murphy will be the presenter for ConServe’s next industry webinar regarding Update on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the impact on collection agencies and the effect that will occur on commercial lenders, credit unions and higher education institutions. To learn more and register for ConServe webinars,
Click here.

About ConServe

ConServe is a leading accounts receivable management service provider specializing in custom collection solutions for its clients. Grounded in ethics and compliance, and unwavering in their pursuit of excellence, they are a consumer-centric organization that functions as an extension of the brands loved by their customers. For over 35 years, they have partnered with their clients to provide unparalleled customer service while helping them achieve their accounts receivable management goals. Visit us Store at: www.conserve-arm.com


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Pamela Murphy wins the Fred Kirschner Award for teaching excellence

ROCHESTER, New York State – Continental Service Group, Inc., dba ConServe is proud to announce that Pam Murphy, Vice President of Compliance and Privacy, has been recognized and received the Fred Kirschner Instruction Achievement Award for hosting 75 seminars at the convention ACA International Annual 2021 in Las Vegas. , NV July 30, 2021.

The Fred Kirschner Instructor Achievement Award is presented to ACA certified instructors who have reached milestones in their volunteer teaching career with ACA. Named after Fred Kirschner, former ACA Certified Instructor and Past President, these awards are given to instructors who have taught 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and more ACA seminars.

Pam had already received this recognition in 2016 for completing 50 seminars, and now again in 2021 for completing 75 seminars. ConServe President Richard Klein commented, “Pam is an inspiration and a wonderful role model, mentor and visionary to our employees and the collection industry.” Pam Murphy said: “I am delighted to be part of a corporate culture that values ​​and contributes to industry and community education efforts. As a certified instructor, I am able to provide impactful training and advice to our employees and industry experts that enable them to be successful. This accountability results in the achievement of an excellent compliance and operational performance
for our valued customers and the industry as a whole.

[article_ad]

Join ConServe on Tuesday September 21, 2021 where Pam Murphy will be the presenter for ConServe’s next industry webinar regarding Update on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the impact on collection agencies and the effect that will occur on commercial lenders, credit unions and higher education institutions. To learn more and register for ConServe webinars,
Click here.

About ConServe

ConServe is a leading accounts receivable management service provider specializing in custom collection solutions for its clients. Grounded in ethics and compliance, and unwavering in their pursuit of excellence, they are a consumer-centric organization that functions as an extension of the brands loved by their customers. For over 35 years, they have partnered with their clients to provide unparalleled customer service while helping them achieve their accounts receivable management goals. Visit us Store at: www.conserve-arm.com


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Albemarle School Division Hosts Webinar on Health Strategies for the Coming Year | Education






STAFF REPORTS

A community informational webinar on mitigation strategies for Albemarle County public schools for the upcoming school year will take place on Zoom Wednesday.

A link to participate in the reunion will be sent to all families on Monday and posted on the school division home page at k12albemarle.org.

Information on the division’s educational and operational plans for the 2021-22 school year can be found on the division’s COVID-19 response webpage, including details and a slide presentation on mitigation strategies. the division.

The school year begins August 23, with in-person instruction in all schools five days a week.

The division said more than 13,000 students will attend schools, which will be the highest number since March 2020. About 400 students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 are expected to attend CSGA’s new all-virtual school.

The division employs a multi-layered range of mitigation strategies and practices, including the requirement to wear masks inside schools.

At Wednesday’s forum, the division’s chief strategic planning officer, Patrick McLaughlin, will discuss the health and safety strategies that will be in place to help prevent the transmission of COVID-19. Division COO Rosalyn Schmitt and Helen Dunn, Legislative and Public Affairs Officer, will answer questions via the Zoom chat.


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Distance education has lowered public school enrollment, study finds

About 300,000 American students did not attend public school last year because their schools did not offer in-person learning, estimated a team of researchers from Stanford University.

That explains about a quarter of the overall decline in enrollment in public schools across the country during the pandemic, when enrollment fell by around 1.1 million students.

“It’s a pretty stark indicator that parents, especially parents of young children, have found the offer of distance education only quite objectionable, and many have chosen to leave,” said Thomas Dee, professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education who co-authored the working paper released on Saturday. “Anyway that breaks, it’s going to have educational implications.”

Not having an in-person learning option reduced kindergarten enrollment by about 3% to 4%, the researchers found, and those numbers tended to increase in states that don’t require Kindergarten. Fully virtual plans may also have contributed to more absences among younger students.

The effect was smaller for older students, with all-virtual learning reducing elementary school enrollment by 1% and having no noticeable effect on middle and high school enrollment.

New analysis confirms previous Chalkbeat and Associated Press reports that found white student enrollment fell more in states where students had fewer options to learn in person. While schools nationwide are promising in-person learning for the coming school year, the numbers also illustrate the scale of the task ahead for districts seeking to re-enroll students who started their school careers elsewhere.

The researchers analyzed enrollment data from 875 school districts, examining the 2020-2021 counts and five years of historical data to account for changing demographics. (The districts they looked at tended to be more urban and suburban and enroll more students of color than the country as a whole, although their enrollment trends before the pandemic followed the country as a whole. The researchers linked this to data from Burbio, which tracked the type of school district instruction offered during the pandemic.

In these districts, researchers found that offering a mix of in-person and virtual instruction did not have a noticeable effect on student enrollment. But offering only distance education has reduced enrollment by a 1.1 percentage point.

Providing distance-only education further impedes enrollment in public schools in school districts that serve rural communities, higher concentrations of Hispanic students, and lower concentrations of black students. This matches polls which have shown black parents to be more wary of face-to-face instructions and more supportive of virtual plans throughout the pandemic.

The long-term effects of these patterns will depend on where the students ended up instead of the public school, Dee said. Some students may have attended private kindergarten, while others may have skipped kindergarten altogether.

“They’re going to bring very different readiness to learn challenges to the classroom,” Dee said. However, if many parents held up their young one-year-olds, it could create unusually large kindergarten classes this fall with more students of varying ages and abilities.

Many school districts have taken extra steps this spring and summer to reconnect with families and encourage them to enroll their children in school. Some communities covered road signs, while others organized virtual tours to show families the health and safety precautions they were taking.

In Spokane, Wash., Where students started last school year fully online, enrollment has fallen nearly 7%. Officials there used text messages and mail to reach families and highlighted their plans to reduce class size as a selling point.

“We want to create as much predictability and try to alleviate the feeling of the unknown and the fear as much as possible,” Superintendent Adam Swinyard said in June.

In Little Rock, Arkansas, Literacy Coach Pamela Criss hopes the students her school district couldn’t count last year will return. Her district offered both all-virtual and all-in-person instruction last fall, and saw enrollment drops of just over 3%, mostly in kindergarten and other elementary grades. The district had lost registrations before the pandemic, but the drop was more pronounced last year.

“We had so many students who didn’t show up on the list, they weren’t in school, they weren’t on Zoom,” Criss said. “We wonder where are these students? Are they at home or have they gone elsewhere?

Today, Criss, who trains teachers and helps students across the district improve their reading skills, wants to make sure educators take a close look at the academic performance of these students and help them out if needed. .

“I wanted to look at their data to see if it was the students who were already late,” she said. “We have to be very intentional and determined in our planning, in our teaching and in our learning. Because we just can’t leave it to chance.


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