Pamela Murphy wins the Fred Kirschner Award for teaching excellence

ROCHESTER, New York State – Continental Service Group, Inc., dba ConServe is proud to announce that Pam Murphy, Vice President of Compliance and Privacy, has been recognized and received the Fred Kirschner Instruction Achievement Award for hosting 75 seminars at the convention ACA International Annual 2021 in Las Vegas. , NV July 30, 2021.

The Fred Kirschner Instructor Achievement Award is presented to ACA certified instructors who have reached milestones in their volunteer teaching career with ACA. Named after Fred Kirschner, former ACA Certified Instructor and Past President, these awards are given to instructors who have taught 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and more ACA seminars.

Pam had already received this recognition in 2016 for completing 50 seminars, and now again in 2021 for completing 75 seminars. ConServe President Richard Klein commented, “Pam is an inspiration and a wonderful role model, mentor and visionary to our employees and the collection industry.” Pam Murphy said: “I am delighted to be part of a corporate culture that values ​​and contributes to industry and community education efforts. As a certified instructor, I am able to provide impactful training and advice to our employees and industry experts that enable them to be successful. This accountability results in the achievement of an excellent compliance and operational performance
for our valued customers and the industry as a whole.

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Join ConServe on Tuesday September 21, 2021 where Pam Murphy will be the presenter for ConServe’s next industry webinar regarding Update on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the impact on collection agencies and the effect that will occur on commercial lenders, credit unions and higher education institutions. To learn more and register for ConServe webinars,
Click here.

About ConServe

ConServe is a leading accounts receivable management service provider specializing in custom collection solutions for its clients. Grounded in ethics and compliance, and unwavering in their pursuit of excellence, they are a consumer-centric organization that functions as an extension of the brands loved by their customers. For over 35 years, they have partnered with their clients to provide unparalleled customer service while helping them achieve their accounts receivable management goals. Visit us Store at: www.conserve-arm.com


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Pamela Murphy wins the Fred Kirschner Award for teaching excellence

ROCHESTER, New York State – Continental Service Group, Inc., dba ConServe is proud to announce that Pam Murphy, Vice President of Compliance and Privacy, has been recognized and received the Fred Kirschner Instruction Achievement Award for hosting 75 seminars at the convention ACA International Annual 2021 in Las Vegas. , NV July 30, 2021.

The Fred Kirschner Instructor Achievement Award is presented to ACA certified instructors who have reached milestones in their volunteer teaching career with ACA. Named after Fred Kirschner, former ACA Certified Instructor and Past President, these awards are given to instructors who have taught 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and more ACA seminars.

Pam had already received this recognition in 2016 for completing 50 seminars, and now again in 2021 for completing 75 seminars. ConServe President Richard Klein commented, “Pam is an inspiration and a wonderful role model, mentor and visionary to our employees and the collection industry.” Pam Murphy said: “I am delighted to be part of a corporate culture that values ​​and contributes to industry and community education efforts. As a certified instructor, I am able to provide impactful training and advice to our employees and industry experts that enable them to be successful. This accountability results in the achievement of an excellent compliance and operational performance
for our valued customers and the industry as a whole.

[article_ad]

Join ConServe on Tuesday September 21, 2021 where Pam Murphy will be the presenter for ConServe’s next industry webinar regarding Update on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the impact on collection agencies and the effect that will occur on commercial lenders, credit unions and higher education institutions. To learn more and register for ConServe webinars,
Click here.

About ConServe

ConServe is a leading accounts receivable management service provider specializing in custom collection solutions for its clients. Grounded in ethics and compliance, and unwavering in their pursuit of excellence, they are a consumer-centric organization that functions as an extension of the brands loved by their customers. For over 35 years, they have partnered with their clients to provide unparalleled customer service while helping them achieve their accounts receivable management goals. Visit us Store at: www.conserve-arm.com


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Albemarle School Division Hosts Webinar on Health Strategies for the Coming Year | Education






STAFF REPORTS

A community informational webinar on mitigation strategies for Albemarle County public schools for the upcoming school year will take place on Zoom Wednesday.

A link to participate in the reunion will be sent to all families on Monday and posted on the school division home page at k12albemarle.org.

Information on the division’s educational and operational plans for the 2021-22 school year can be found on the division’s COVID-19 response webpage, including details and a slide presentation on mitigation strategies. the division.

The school year begins August 23, with in-person instruction in all schools five days a week.

The division said more than 13,000 students will attend schools, which will be the highest number since March 2020. About 400 students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 are expected to attend CSGA’s new all-virtual school.

The division employs a multi-layered range of mitigation strategies and practices, including the requirement to wear masks inside schools.

At Wednesday’s forum, the division’s chief strategic planning officer, Patrick McLaughlin, will discuss the health and safety strategies that will be in place to help prevent the transmission of COVID-19. Division COO Rosalyn Schmitt and Helen Dunn, Legislative and Public Affairs Officer, will answer questions via the Zoom chat.


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Distance education has lowered public school enrollment, study finds

About 300,000 American students did not attend public school last year because their schools did not offer in-person learning, estimated a team of researchers from Stanford University.

That explains about a quarter of the overall decline in enrollment in public schools across the country during the pandemic, when enrollment fell by around 1.1 million students.

“It’s a pretty stark indicator that parents, especially parents of young children, have found the offer of distance education only quite objectionable, and many have chosen to leave,” said Thomas Dee, professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education who co-authored the working paper released on Saturday. “Anyway that breaks, it’s going to have educational implications.”

Not having an in-person learning option reduced kindergarten enrollment by about 3% to 4%, the researchers found, and those numbers tended to increase in states that don’t require Kindergarten. Fully virtual plans may also have contributed to more absences among younger students.

The effect was smaller for older students, with all-virtual learning reducing elementary school enrollment by 1% and having no noticeable effect on middle and high school enrollment.

New analysis confirms previous Chalkbeat and Associated Press reports that found white student enrollment fell more in states where students had fewer options to learn in person. While schools nationwide are promising in-person learning for the coming school year, the numbers also illustrate the scale of the task ahead for districts seeking to re-enroll students who started their school careers elsewhere.

The researchers analyzed enrollment data from 875 school districts, examining the 2020-2021 counts and five years of historical data to account for changing demographics. (The districts they looked at tended to be more urban and suburban and enroll more students of color than the country as a whole, although their enrollment trends before the pandemic followed the country as a whole. The researchers linked this to data from Burbio, which tracked the type of school district instruction offered during the pandemic.

In these districts, researchers found that offering a mix of in-person and virtual instruction did not have a noticeable effect on student enrollment. But offering only distance education has reduced enrollment by a 1.1 percentage point.

Providing distance-only education further impedes enrollment in public schools in school districts that serve rural communities, higher concentrations of Hispanic students, and lower concentrations of black students. This matches polls which have shown black parents to be more wary of face-to-face instructions and more supportive of virtual plans throughout the pandemic.

The long-term effects of these patterns will depend on where the students ended up instead of the public school, Dee said. Some students may have attended private kindergarten, while others may have skipped kindergarten altogether.

“They’re going to bring very different readiness to learn challenges to the classroom,” Dee said. However, if many parents held up their young one-year-olds, it could create unusually large kindergarten classes this fall with more students of varying ages and abilities.

Many school districts have taken extra steps this spring and summer to reconnect with families and encourage them to enroll their children in school. Some communities covered road signs, while others organized virtual tours to show families the health and safety precautions they were taking.

In Spokane, Wash., Where students started last school year fully online, enrollment has fallen nearly 7%. Officials there used text messages and mail to reach families and highlighted their plans to reduce class size as a selling point.

“We want to create as much predictability and try to alleviate the feeling of the unknown and the fear as much as possible,” Superintendent Adam Swinyard said in June.

In Little Rock, Arkansas, Literacy Coach Pamela Criss hopes the students her school district couldn’t count last year will return. Her district offered both all-virtual and all-in-person instruction last fall, and saw enrollment drops of just over 3%, mostly in kindergarten and other elementary grades. The district had lost registrations before the pandemic, but the drop was more pronounced last year.

“We had so many students who didn’t show up on the list, they weren’t in school, they weren’t on Zoom,” Criss said. “We wonder where are these students? Are they at home or have they gone elsewhere?

Today, Criss, who trains teachers and helps students across the district improve their reading skills, wants to make sure educators take a close look at the academic performance of these students and help them out if needed. .

“I wanted to look at their data to see if it was the students who were already late,” she said. “We have to be very intentional and determined in our planning, in our teaching and in our learning. Because we just can’t leave it to chance.


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Added video: Webinar on the immunization mandate

UC Davis will host a webinar for employees and students during the noon hour Wednesday (August 4) on the topic of UC’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate. Watch the video recording above.

The program is open to everyone, including parents. The Davis campus announced the webinar in emails sent Friday to employees and students for whom the university has no record of their coronavirus vaccination. See below for how to report your vaccination information yourself and what to do if you have already reported your information but still received the webinar announcement.

RELATED CONTENT

As of Saturday, July 31, the Davis campus combined vaccination rate (employees and students) stood at 64% (70% employees and 62% students), according to the COVID-19 dashboard of the UC Davis.

Marshal and Executive Vice Chancellor Mary Croughan, epidemiologist, will open the webinar by discussing the importance of COVID-19 vaccines in overcoming the pandemic and allowing the campus to resume operations (including in-person teaching), as planned , in the grave.

Other panelists: Eric Kvigne, Associate Vice-Chancellor, Security Services; Cindy Schorzman, Medical Director, Student Health and Counseling Services; Pablo Reguerín, Vice-Chancellor, Student Affairs; Julia johnson and Danielle Kehler, Labor and Employee Relations Managers, Davis Campus and UC Davis Health, respectively; and Binnie Singh, Assistant Vice-President, Academic Affairs.

The organizers collected people’s questions when they registered for the webinar and will also answer questions via the Q&A feature during the program.

Compliance or exception

The UC President’s office announced that his vaccination mandate was final on July 15 for all faculty, staff and students in the system. The effective date for the Davis campus is September 8, two weeks prior to the first day of teaching.

Employees and students are reminded that the vaccination process can take anywhere from two to six weeks, depending on the vaccine administered. Check out a timeline for when you need to receive your photo (s) to meet the September 8 deadline.

Without vaccination, you will need an exception based on medical or religious grounds, or postponement for pregnancy. Employees and students have different application processes, as follows:

If you are an employee requesting a medical or religious exception or a postponement for pregnancy:

  • Log in to health email.
  • Click “Messages” from the menu on the left side of the page.
  • To select “New message” at the top of your inbox.
  • Select “Request a COVID medical exception or a religious exception or a medical postponement”
  • Fill out the form and submit.
  • A third-party vendor, Sedgwick, will contact you in about a week with further instructions. The University of California has contracted with the company to collect and track inquiries and perform initial assessments for employees through the UC system.

If you are a student and request a medical or religious exception or postponement for pregnancy:

  • Log in to health email.
  • Click “Messages” from the menu on the left side of the page.
  • To select “New message” at the top of your inbox.
  • Select “Request an exception or postponement of the COVID-19 vaccine policy”
  • Select “Student or student employee”
  • Select “Download the exception request form”
  • Download one of the following three forms: medical exception, request for postponement (for pregnancy) or religious exception (all PDFs).
  • Complete the form (s) and obtain the appropriate signature (s).

Students should submit the forms as follows:

  • Medical Exception or Deferral Request Form – Follow the first five steps from the lists above (log into Health-e-Messaging, click “Messages”, select “New Message”, select “Request Exception or a postponement of the COVID-19 vaccine policy “and select” Student or student employee.
  • Select “Submit a completed medical exception or deferral request form.” “
  • Select “Add Attachment” to add forms.
  • Select “Send”.

Alternative: If you are a student looking for a religious exception:

IF APPROVED: Employees and students with exceptions or deferrals should adhere to campus protocols for the unvaccinated, which currently require face coverings indoors and in crowded areas outdoors, and testing every fourth days.

IF REFUSED: You must be fully vaccinated by September 8. Otherwise, as the webinar will explain, employees will face consequences up to and including termination, and students’ access to campus and university programs and services will be restricted. This means that students may not be able to attend classes, events or other activities in person on campus. Once a student complies with the policy, the restrictions will be removed.

Other accommodations

Employees who believe they need further accommodation should work with Disability Management Services. Students with personal health concerns who cannot receive the COVID-19 vaccine or who have other medical reasons affecting their ability to attend campus in the fall should contact the Student Disability Center to discuss possible accommodations.

IMMUNIZATION REPORT

Employees and students are encouraged to report their immunization status in the Health-e-Messaging portal. If you have been vaccinated in California, the easiest way to report your information is to allow the university to collect your data from the state vaccine registry.

  • Log in to Health-e-Messaging.
  • Click on “Medical Authorizations” in the menu on the left of the page.
  • Click on “COVID-19 Vaccine Verification Authorization”.
  • “Sign” the form electronically.

Otherwise, you can declare yourself by providing your vaccination date (s) and uploading images of the front and back of your vaccination card. (Look for the blue bar titled “Enter my COVID-19 vaccination information” on the health email landing page.)

If you had already done this before Friday and still received an email announcing the webinar, you should notify Student Health and Counseling Services, which manages email for students and employees. The notification should be sent by email: [email protected]

More information on self-reporting your immunization information is available here. Be sure to check out this FAQ: “I am fully vaccinated. Why don’t you have my vaccination record?


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Robot-assisted instruction: what is it? How it works? Will a robot replace me? – Colombia School of Medicine


Registration

Participants must register to receive the webinar link.


About the program

Research has shown that robots can be an effective tool for teachers and special education therapists.

Students with special needs, especially students on the autism spectrum, pay more attention to robot-assisted instruction than other “traditional” types of instruction.

So how does it all work? Are you telling me that I have to learn how to program a robot?

Learn more about robot-assisted instruction, how it works, and how it can help students achieve more and help the teacher or therapist show results.


About the presenter

Ted Klopp, Westminster Technologies

Ted Klopp has worked with teachers and therapists in the field of special education for the past decade. As the right hand of his wife’s business, Ted is tasked with doing a bit of everything. His experience includes, but is not limited to, sales, marketing, training and demonstrations. Specifically, Ted ensures that customers are successful with the products and services they choose. When Ted is not at work, he specializes in telling bad jokes, boring his wife and trying to raise their three boys (twins aged 7 and 9).


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How hybrid classrooms are at the forefront of futuristic learning

Classrooms have been locked, school hallways have become silent and buses have remained parked on campuses with the rapid closure of educational institutions across the world in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the face of this upheaval, EdTech startups in India began to rise to the challenge – ensuring that young learners had the opportunity to continue and complete their education during the lockdown.

Reports suggest that by 2025, this sector is expected to grow by $ 10 billion at a compound annual growth rate of 39%. With this in mind, the industry must now deliver quality educational experiences that not only overcome the challenges brought on by the pandemic, but also dramatically improve the physical learning ecosystem in the classroom. We believe that this is only possible thanks to hybrid classes.

Are hybrid classes the new face of education?

This new teaching model where face-to-face classroom teaching is combined with online learning offers many advantages. In addition to using technology to personalize learning, these classrooms of the future exploit advanced and innovative teaching methods to capture the attention of the student. Teachers have now adapted to unique teaching methods, such as integrating household resources with next-generation apps to perform activities and lessons. They learned how to create short videos and presentations to make the lessons more engaging and interactive, which improved the overall skills of the teaching staff. And that’s just the beginning.

With a host of benefits, it’s no wonder that Hybrid Classes – Futuristic School Learning – was chosen as the theme for the AWS Toppr webinar, hosted by YourStory. The hour-long session will take place on August 12 at 4:00 p.m. and will host a panel of experts – in technology and education – deliberating on the way forward for education.

The session will begin with an interesting conversation about the evolution of classrooms and the type of challenges created by the pandemic. The panelists will then delve into the teaching techniques that must be adopted to fit into the hybrid classroom model. Many organizations, including Toppr, can attest to the urgent need to train teachers in new teaching methodologies and techniques. The panel will offer their perspective on these topics, including choosing the right tools for improving skills, identifying quality trainers and creating effective training modules for teachers.

The webinar ends with an excerpt on the role of online platforms in the future and the steps that policymakers will take to shape the future of education in the country.

Panelists:

Rohitashwa Choudhary, Senior Vice President, Toppr

Durga Kakaraparthi, Head of AWS Solutions Architecture, Public Sector

Dhriti Malhotra, Principal Director, Manav Rachna International School, Gurugram

Shivani Muthanna, Senior Business News Presenter and Program Producer, YourStory Media

Who will be present?

The session will be attended by the school fraternity, including principals, principals and senior management

If you are a teacher or work in EdTech, this webinar is for you. Click here to register.



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Flagstaff Unified School District discusses COVID protocols in webinar | Education






Students fill a room at Mount Elden Middle School as two touring groups pass each other in this file photo from March.


Jake Bacon, Arizona Daily Sun File


ABIGAIL KESSLER Journalist Sun

School starts next week for most Flagstaff students and the district is busy responding to updated CDC guidelines regarding COVID-19.

For most districts, the renewed effort to return to good health is more about communicating plans already in place than changing policies.

After sending out information to families and staff about its COVID-19 response plans, FUSD hosted a webinar on Monday to discuss a few specific topics and answer questions. It opened with a short video presentation on educational models, mitigation strategies and ESSER III funding – the same models last discussed at the July 13 board meeting that the presenters of the webinar highlighted as “cohesive and layered”.

In-person learning is the district’s priority, according to FUSD Superintendent Michael Penca, who said all boards started by discussing the importance of having physical students in schools and this was reflected in what he had seen during the distance learning year of the FUSD. He listed learning, physical health, and socio-emotional growth as being negatively impacted by distance learning.

During the question-and-answer portion of the event, Penca further explained the reasoning of the FUSD for not imposing the masks.

“It is, in our state, an individual choice,” Penca said of Arizona’s masking law. “… We educate our staff, students and families of the CDC’s recommendations and also encourage this use and make sure that we understand that individual choice will be supported and respected anyway.” “


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Q&A Collections: Differentiating Teaching (Reviews)

During the summer, I share thematic articles gathering answers on similar topics from the last 10 years. You can see all of these collections from the first nine years here.

Here are the ones I’ve posted so far:

The 11 Most Popular Classroom Q&A Posts of the Year

Race and racism in schools

School closures and the coronavirus crisis

Classroom management tips

Best ways to start the school year

The best ways to end the school year

Student motivation and socio-emotional learning

Implement the common core

Challenging normative gender culture in education

Social science education

Cooperative and collaborative learning

Using technology with students

Student voices

Parent engagement in schools

Teaching English Language Learners

Reading instruction

Teaching writing

Educational policy issues

Evaluation

Today’s theme is pedagogical differentiation. You can see the list of messages following this snippet of one of them:

* Five ways to differentiate teaching in an online environment

Examples of two educators include giving students time to take physical breaks as well as suspending academic presentations to give students time to think.

* Seven Ways to Support ELLs in Online Content Courses

I offer seven suggestions on how to help English language learners during distance education, including providing graphic organizers and templates.

* “Just means providing what they need”

This four-part series on “fair” versus “equal” is being “ended” today with answers from Rick Wormeli, Pedro A. Noguera, Ph.D., Elizabeth Stringer Keefe, Ph.D. , and Sheila Wilson.

* “Fair practices uplift everyone”

Debbie Silver, Gloria Brown Brooks, Tasha Moyer, Barbara Blackburn and LaChawn Smith discuss whether “fair” means “equal” in education.

* The differences between students are not deficits

Today’s comments on the difference between treating students ‘equally’ and ‘fairly’ come from Kelly Capatosto, Gina Laura Gullo, Cheryl Staats, PJ Caposey, Ashley McCall, Orion Nolan, Jen Schwanke, Marisa Nathan, Carol Bruzzano , Keisha Rembert and Tatiana Esteban.

* ‘Fair is not equal’

Julia Stearns Cloat, Rocio del Castillo, Holly Spinelli, Sabrina Hope King, Joe Feldman and Felicia Darling discuss the difference between treating students “fairly” and “fairly”.

* Everything you wanted to know about differentiation but were afraid to ask

New videos, as well as many other resources, on differentiated teaching!

* “The best place to start” when teaching ELL “is to get to know your students”

Judie Haynes, Debbie Zacarian, Eugenia Mora-Flores, Melissa Jackson, Joyce Nutta and Carine Strebel bring their ideas on differentiated instruction for English language learners.

* Differentiate ELLs by “establishing a welcoming and safe classroom”

Sandra C. Figueroa, Becky Corr, Sydney Snyder, Adria Klein, Michael D. Toth and Barbara Gottschalk share their suggestions on differentiating teaching for ELLs.

* Ways to differentiate teaching for ELLs

Valentina Gonzalez, Jenny Vo, Tonya Ward Singer, Carol Ann Tomlinson and Nélida Rubio discuss ways to differentiate teaching for English language learners.

* “Embracing Technology” as a differentiation tool

Elizabeth Stringer Keefe, Becky Shiring, Katie Robinson, Sonny Magana and Monica Burns provide their suggestions on using technology to differentiate teaching.

* Ways to use technology to differentiate teaching

Anne Jenks, Ge-Anne Bolhuis, Nancy Sylla, Sarah Shartzer, Daniel L. Schwartz, Jessia M. Tsang and Kristen P. Blair share their suggestions on using technology to differentiate teaching.

* Differentiate the teaching of algebra

Wendy Jennings, Yvelyne Germain-McCarthy, Billy Bender, Derek Cabrera and Ed Thomas provide their thoughts on the teaching of differentiated algebra.

* Differentiation allows us to reach our students “where they are”

These contributions come from Katherine S. McKnight, Jessica Hockett, Christie Amburn, Elise Yerkey and Barbara Blackburn.

* Differentiation is important “because we teach students and not standards”

Three well-known educators / authors provide guest answers in this article: Regie Routman, Carol Ann Tomlinson, and Laura Robb.

* “Differentiation is more than a set of strategies”

This article features a response from Kimberly Kappler Hewitt and a number of reader suggestions.

* Differentiate lessons by “content, process or product”

Carol Tomlinson, Donalyn Miller and Jeff Charbonneau contribute answers.

* Use — not abuse — skill groups in the classroom

This is a special guest article by author / educator Rick Wormeli.

* Capacity consolidation in schools – Part 2

In this article, Carol Burris, 2013 New York High School Principal of the Year, and Tammy Heflebower, Vice President of the Marzano Research Lab, provide their thoughts, along with reader feedback.

* Several ways to differentiate teaching

I was lucky to have both Carol Tomlinson and Rick Wormeli to contribute their ideas here!

* More Ways to Differentiate Teaching – Part Two

This article features contributions from Megan Allen, Florida State Professor of the Year 2010, and Kimberly Kappler Hewitt and Daniel K. Weckstein, co-authors of Differentiation is an expectation: A leader’s guide to building a culture of differentiation.

And here are several videos we made with Ed Week on this topic:


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Q&A Collections: Teaching Writing (Reviews)

During the summer, I share thematic articles gathering answers on similar topics from the last 10 years. You can see all of these collections from the first nine years here.

Here are the ones I’ve posted so far:

The 11 Most Popular Classroom Q&A Posts of the Year

Race and racism in schools

School closures and the coronavirus crisis

Classroom management tips

Best ways to start the school year

The best ways to end the school year

Student motivation and socio-emotional learning

Implement the common core

Challenging normative gender culture in education

Social science education

Cooperative and collaborative learning

Using technology with students

Student voices

Parent engagement in schools

Teaching English Language Learners

Reading instruction

Today’s theme is teaching writing. You can see the list of messages following this snippet of one of them:

* Teaching writing requires leaving students with an “I can do this!” ” Spirit

Three educators share suggestions for teaching writing, including a visual thinking strategy.

* Four strategies for effective writing instruction

Three educators share their best ideas on teaching K-12 writing, including writing frames and graphic organizers.

* Seven strategies for teaching grammar

Five educators share instructional strategies for engaging and effective grammar instruction.

* 17 approaches to encourage students to revise their writing

Five educators offer instructional strategies to use in teaching handwriting review, including the power of an authentic audience.

* Ways to help ignite students’ intrinsic desire for writing review

Five educators make suggestions that might help students want to revise their writing, including using “editing stations”.

* ‘I’m no longer giving grades on student writing assignments, and that’s the best thing ever!’

Five educators talk about how they helped motivate students to review their writing.

* Make writing revision a “collaborative process”

Six educators discuss strategies they used to encourage students to review their writing, such as demonstrating their own practice.

* 12 strategies to encourage students to want to revise their writing

Four educators share suggestions for creating the classroom conditions in which students want to revise their writing.

* Spreading the “love of poetry” in the classroom

Nine educators share instructional strategies they use to teach poetry, including reading aloud and studying and writing odes.

* Teach poetry in a “fun” way

Four educators share multiple ways of teaching poetry, including modeling and imitating writing, so that students can appreciate and appreciate the literary form.

* Six ways to teach poetry

Five teachers share strategies for teaching poetry, including using a “Poem of the Week” to promote social justice and using photos to engage students.

* Students feel more motivated when writing for an “authentic audience”

Shanna Peeples, Mary K. Tedrow, Amy Sandvold, and Laverne Bowers “wrap up” this five-part series on students writing for “genuine audiences”.

* ‘Invite students to write real arguments’

Rita Platt, Alexis Wiggins, Jenny Grant Rankin, Kristen Koppers, and Mara Lee Grayson share their ideas on how and why students can write for audiences other than the teacher.

* ‘Design writing tasks that bridge the gap between the classroom and the outside world’

Martha Sevetson Rush, Donna L. Shrum, Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Michael Fisher, Tamara Letter, and Keisha Rembert share their thoughts on authentic audiences for student writers.

* Ways students can write for “authentic audiences”

Jayne Marlink, Cheryl Mizerny, Erin Starkey, Nicole Brown, Dawn Mitchell and John Larmer share their suggestions on how to encourage students to write for an “authentic audience”.

* “When students send their work to the world, it changes everything”

Katherine Schulten, Kelly Love, Tatiana Esteban, Kimiko Shibata, Alycia Owen, and Jennifer Orr offer suggestions on how students can write for an “authentic audience”.

* Teaching Reading and Writing in the Age of Coronavirus

Keeping it simple, staying flexible, and keeping the routine familiar are among the suggestions three educators give for assigning work to students while learning at a distance.

* Connecting reading and writing “is a highly leveraged movement”

Five educators recommend strategies for using reading instruction as a tool to improve students’ writing skills, including the use of informal writing and sections of reading texts that students can use as role models. their writing.

* Ways in which reading can support the teaching of writing

Five educators share ideas on how teaching reading can help students become more effective writers, including through the use of mentoring texts and through a guided step-by-step process.

* “Writing helps develop readers”

Asking students to write about what they read and asking them to compose in a variety of formats is part of the advice seven educators offer as they discuss the role of writing in teaching reading.

* “Writing directly benefits students’ reading skills”

Five senior educators discuss how teaching writing can support the development of reading skills for K-12 students and provide tips for doing this important work.

* “We should embrace writing in the social sciences”

Martha Sevetson Rush, Andrew Miller, Melissa Miles, Donna L. Shrum, and Richard Byrne share their thoughts on writing in social studies class.

* Ways to Incorporate Writing into Social Studies Classes

Stan Pesick, Ben Alvord, Dawn Mitchell, Rachel Johnson, and Rebecca Testa-Ryan share their suggestions on incorporating writing into social studies classes.

* “All comments are not equal”

The final article in this series on student writing comments includes responses from Stacey Shubitz, Carol Pelletier Radford, Melanie Ward, Tasha Thomas, Dawn Mitchell, Jen Schwanke, and Donna L. Shrum. I also share readers’ comments.

* “Sometimes the best feedback from students is encouragement to continue”

Regie Routman, Paul Solarz, David Hochheiser, Kathy T. Glass, Catherine Beck, and Keith McCarroll offer their wisdom to provide advice to student writers.

* Ways to give effective feedback on student writing

Susan M. Brookhart, Ph.D., Cheryl Mizerny, Amy Benjamin, Kate Wolfe Maxlow, Karen Sanzo, Andrew Miller, David Campos and Kathleen Fad share their comments on how best to provide feedback on student writing.

* Provide writing comments that “help students tell their story”

Anabel Gonzalez, Sarah Woodard, Kim Jaxon, Ralph Fletcher, Mary Beth Nicklaus and Leah Wilson begin a four-part series on student writing feedback.

* “Writing frames help students organize their thinking”

Matthew Perini, David Campos, Kathleen Fad, Jocelyn A. Chadwick and Diane Mora complete a three-part series on writing frames.

* “Writing frames are the recipes of writing”

Patty McGee, Jules Csillag, Sara Holbrook, Michael Salinger and Kathy Glass share their ideas on pedagogical strategies for teaching writing.

* Strategies for using writing “frames” and “structures”

Beth Rimer, Linda Denstaedt, Gretchen Bernabei, Nancy Boyles, Mary Shea, Nancy Roberts, and Eileen Depka contribute ideas on how to use writing frames and writing structures in the classroom.

* How to “weave writing throughout science lessons”

Anne Vilen, Sheila Wagoner, ReLeah Cossett Lent, Jason Wirtz, Amy Benjamin, Jennifer L. Altieri and Fred Ende provide their suggestions on incorporating writing into science lessons.

* Ways to integrate writing into science lessons

Mary K. Tedrow, Amy Roediger, Maria Grant, Diane Lapp, Ed.D., Mandi White, Tara Dale, and Becky Bone share their suggestions on how to incorporate writing into science class.

* Mistakes made in writing instructions and what to do instead

Lisa Eickholdt, Kathleen Neagle Sokolowski, Mary Ann Zehr, Nancy Frey, and Valentina Gonzalez share their thoughts on teaching writing.

* Avoid “missed opportunities” in teaching writing

Eugenia Mora-Flores, Julia G. Thompson, Karen Sher, Bret Gosselin, Vicky Giouroukakis and Emily Geltz provide their suggestions on teaching writing.

* ‘Don’t write down every piece of writing a student creates’

Tan Huynh, Lynell Powell, Rebecca Alber, Cheryl Mizerny, Mitchell Nobis, and Kai Marks write about mistakes made in teaching writing.

* We need to “slow down” when teaching writing

We end this series on teaching writing with answers from Alan Sitomer, Sean Ruday, Jen Schwanke, Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Kathy Glass, Meghan Everette and Brian Kissel.

* “Writing in math class is a win-win solution for students and teachers”

Linda Dacey, Sandy Atkins, Andrea Clark, Mike Flynn, ReLeah Cossett Lent and Shannon Jones share their ideas on how to integrate writing into math education.

* Teaching of writing and common core – Third part

This article contains comments from Amy Benjamin, Alice Mercer, and many readers.

* Preparing students to write is “about our own collaboration”

Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Kathy Glass and Carol Jago share their ideas.

* Develop student writers by letting them speak …

This article shares comments from educators Mary Tedrow, Ray Salazar, and Tanya Baker.

* Many Ways English Teachers Can Improve Their Art

Authors / educators Penny Kittle and Carol Jago provide their answers.

* “Ten Elements of Effective Teaching”

This article includes plays by Jim Burke and David B. Cohen, as well as reader commentary.

* Many ways to help students develop academic vocabulary

Several educators / authors — Marilee Sprenger, Jane Hill and Kirsten Miller, and Maria Gonzalez — provide guest responses.

* Celebrate the good writing of our students

This article shares guest responses from three educators: Mary Tedrow, Doug Fisher, and Nancy Frey.

* Helping Our Students Become Better Writers, Part 2

Three educators, Aimee Buckner, Carolyn Coman and Tanya Baker bring their ideas here.

* Helping boys become stronger writers

Educator and author Ralph Fletcher shares his insights on how we can specifically help boys become stronger writers.

* A “towel curriculum for writing”

Author and teacher Barry Lane provides his perspective in this article.

* Teach writing while respecting students’ ideas

Professors Renee Moore and Ray Salazar share their contributions, and I add my suggestions.


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